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No Rights Reserved—Exhibition Design





Art Center Summer 2019                 Special Thanks : Stephen Serrato, Fraser Muggeridge



No Rights Reserved is a museum catalog design for a fictional Chinese contemporary appropriation art exhibition that locates at Tate Modern, London. It was made as a student project at ArtCenter College of Design.

In traditional Chinese calligraphy education, apprentices generally start from a facsimile. During the process of transposing previous works, apprentices sometimes create a better version, transcending its original form. The ancients attributed this transcendence to the “I” in the book. However, the booming development of Internet technology makes access to artwork more convenient than ever, the difference between appropriating and copying has been blurred gradually. Taking a form of art and directly applying to the other becomes a new way of art-making.

“No Rights Reserved” recreates a definition of the well-known phrase— “All Rights Reserved” as a conversation starter. The goal is not to criticize any form of artistic expression. It is intended to discuss: What is appropriation? What is plagiarism? Do the two have a border? If so, what is it?

In the first chapter of the book, I “copied” an exhibition catalogue as the starting point of my design. The catalogue recorded the
art exhibition that took place in 105 Hudson Street, Manhattan, New York—the very first art exhibition to discuss “appropriation art.” Imagery was selected from the famous Shenzhen Dafen Oil Painting Village in China.

无版权,违者不究“是一个位于伦敦泰特现代美术馆的虚构中国当代借用艺术展览的博物馆画册设计。在中国传统书法教育中,学徒通常开始于临摹。在临摹标本作品的过程中,学徒有时会创建一个更好的版本,超越其原始形式。古人把这种超越归因于书中的“本我”与“超我”。但是,网络技术的飞速发展使得对艺术品的观赏比以往任何时候都更加方便,借用和抄袭之间的差异逐渐变得模糊。采用一种艺术形式并直接应用于另一种艺术成为一种新的艺术创作方式。“无版权,违者不究”重新创建了众所周知的短语“无版权,违者必究”的定义,将其作为对话的开始。目的是不批评任何形式的艺术表达。旨在讨论:什么是借用?什么是抄袭?两者有边界吗?如果是这样,那这个边界又是什么?在本书的第一章中,我“复制”了一本展览画册作为设计的起点。这本画册记录了第一场用借用艺术作为标题的艺术展览。它发生在1977年,纽约曼哈顿哈德逊街105号。这是首个讨论“盗用艺术”的艺术展览。与之搭配的图像选自中国著名的深圳大芬油画村。






























Mark